International Nurses Day (jyosilpsycho-hub.com)

International Nurses Day

Who started Nurses Day?

International Nurses Day (IND) is an international day held on May 12th every year around the world to commemorate the contribution of nurses to society. Since 1965, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) has celebrated this day. It all started in 1953, when Dorothy Sutherland, an official of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, contacted President Dwight D. Eisenhower and gave proposed to be declared a “Nurse Day “. However, he disagrees the proposal at the time.

What happens in International Nurses Day?

In January 1974, May 12 was chosen to celebrate this day because it was the anniversary of the birth of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern care. Every year, International Council of Nurses prepares and distributes the International Nurses Day kit. The toolkit contains educational and public information materials that can be used by nurses everywhere. May 8 of every year has been designated because the National Student Nurses Day.

Who is Florence Nightingale?

Florence Nightingale was born in 12 May 1820. She was a British social reformer, statistician and founder of modern nursing. Nightingale was unexpectedly a nurse manager and trainer during the Crimean War. During that war, she organized nursing care for wounded soldiers in Constantinople. She brought an honest reputation to nurses and have become a logo of Victorian culture, especially within the persona of “The Lady with the Lamp” making rounds of wounded soldiers at night.

In 1860, she established a nursing school at St Thomas’ Hospital in London, laying the foundation for professional nursing. It was the world’s first secular nursing school and is now part of King’s College London.

In recognition of her pioneering work in nursing, the new nurses presented the “Nightingale Oath” and awarded the Florence Nightingale Medal, which is the highest international honour, she can achieve in the field of nurses, and every year The once International Nurses’ Day was celebrated on her birthday. Her social reforms include improving health care for all levels of British society, advocating that India better eliminate hunger, helping to repeal harsh prostitution laws for women, and expanding the form of women’s participation within the labour force.

Nightingale is also a versatile writer. In her lifetime, much of her published work was concerned with spreading medical knowledge. Some of her books are written in simple English, so people with poor literary skills can easily understand them. Most of her writings, including extensive works on religion and mysticism, were only published after her death.

Why is International Nurses Day important?

Nightingale’s lasting contribution has always been her role in establishing the modern nursing profession. She has set an example of compassion, commitment to patient care, and diligent and thoughtful hospital management. Her first official nurse training program was her Nightingale Nursing School, which opened in 1860 and is now known as the Florence Nightingale Nursing and Midwifery Department at King’s College London.

In 1912, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) established the Florence Nightingale Medal, which is awarded to nurses or nursing assistants every two years in recognition of their outstanding service. This is the highest international honour that a nurse can achieve, and is awarded to a nurse or nursing assistant for “special courage and dedication to civilian victims of injury, illness or disability or conflict or disaster” or “model service or innovative pioneering spirit in public health” Or the spirit of nursing education”.

Since 1965, every year on Florence Nightingale birthday (May 12), International Nurses Day has been celebrated. The President of India awards nursing professionals the “National Florence Nightingale Award” every year on the International Nurses Day. The award was established in 1973 to recognize the outstanding performance of nursing professionals with dedication, sincerity, dedication and compassion.

What is Florence Nightingale Award ?

At the 8th International Conference of the Red Cross in London in 1907, the participants decided to establish a commemorative International Nightingale Medal to reward outstanding people in the field of nursing. Subsequently, the International Conference of the Red Cross (ICRC) established the Florence Nightingale Medal in 1912. This is the highest international honour that a nurse can achieve, and is awarded to a nurse or nursing assistant for “special courage and dedication to civilian victims of injury, illness or disability or conflict or disaster” or “model service or innovative pioneering spirit in public health” Or the spirit of nursing education”.

Although the original 42 awards were only awarded in 1920 under the interference of the First World War, the original establishment was awarded to six nurses each year. Among the initial recipients, there were six American nurses: Florence Merriam Johnson, Helen Scott Hay, Linda K. Miles, Martha Russell, and Mary Guerra Devin and Alma Foster. Ida F. Butler is the 15th American winner of the award.

In the year 2017, the 46th medal was awarded to 39 winners in 22 countries, including Major General Sylvia Trent Adams, acting surgeon in the United States. Roselyn Nugba-Ballah became the first person to receive the Liberian Medal for his work in the Ebola epidemic.

In the year 2019, the 48th medal was awarded to 29 nurses from 19 countries, including New Zealand Red Cross and Captain Felicity Gapes.

What is the theme for Nurses Day 2021?

The theme of this year is Nurses: A Voice to Lead – A vision for future healthcare.

What were the themes of International Nurses Day ever year?

The International Council of Nurses (ICN) themes for International Nurses Day:

1988 – Safe Motherhood

1989 – School Health

1990 – Nurses and Environment

1991 – Mental Health – Nurses in Action

1992 – Healthy Aging

1993 – Quality, costs and Nursing

1994 – Healthy Families for Healthy Nation

1995 – Women’s Health: Nurses Pave the Way

1996 – Better Health through Nursing Research

1997 – Healthy Young People = A Brighter Future

1998 – Partnership for Community Health

1999 – Celebrating Nursing’s Past, claiming the future

2000 – Nurses – Always there for you

2001 – Nurses, Always There for You: United Against Violence

2002 – Nurses Always There for You: Caring for Families

2003 – Nurses: Fighting AIDS stigma, working for all

2004 – Nurses: Working with the Poor; Against Poverty

2005 – Nurses for Patients’ Safety: Targeting counterfeit medicines and substandard medication

2006 – Safe staffing saves lives

2007 – Positive practice environments: Quality workplaces = quality patient care

2008 – Delivering Quality, Serving Communities: Nurses Leading Primary Health Care and social care

2009 – Delivering Quality, Serving Communities: Nurses Leading Care Innovations

2010 – Delivering Quality, Serving Communities: Nurses Leading Chronic Care

2011 – Closing The Gap: Increasing Access and Equity

2012 – Closing The Gap: From Evidence to Action

2013 – Closing The Gap: Millennium Development Goals

2014 – Nurses: A Force for Change – A vital resource for health

2015 – Nurses: A Force for Change: Care Effective, Cost Effective

2016 – Nurses: A Force for Change: Improving Health Systems’ Resilience

2017 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

2018 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Health is a Human right

2019 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Health for All

2020 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead – Nursing the World to Health

2021 – Nurses: A Voice to Lead – A vision for future healthcare

References:

  • “Florence Nightingale Medal”. International Committee of the Red Cross. 2003. Retrieved 25 June 2010.
  • “The Florence Nightingale Medal” (PDF). British Journal of Nursing: 334. 5 June 1920. Retrieved 25 June 2010.
  • Nelson McDowell Shepard, “The Florence Nightingale Medal” Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine (November 1921): 646–647.
  • “News about Nursing”. The American Journal of Nursing. 37 (7): 801–710. 1937. doi:10.1097/00000446-193707000-00026. ISSN 0002-936X. JSTOR 3413368.
  • “Florence Nightingale Medal: 2015 recipients”. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  • “Florence Nightingale Medal: 2017 recipients”. Retrieved 15 May 2017.
  • Harmon, William Q. (1 December 2017). “”A True Patriot,” Nurse Roselyn Ballah, Gets Nightingale Award Presented”. Liberian Observer.
  • “Florence Nightingale Medal: Honoring exceptional nurses and nursing aides – 2019 recipients”. icrc.org. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and the International Council of Nurses. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  • “Kiwi Red Cross nurse awarded highest international nursing award”. TVNZ. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  • “President gives Florence Nightingale Awards to 35 nurses”. Times of India. 13 May 2016. Archived from the original on 2 May 2016.

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